Job Seekers! .. To increase your chances of getting hired:
Post your CV on Bayt by clicking here

Employers! ..
  • To have more exposure on your jobs:
    Post your jobs on Bayt by clicking here
  • To find resumes:
    Check CV search on Bayt by clicking here

  • Author Topic: A gouache paint  (Read 23 times)

    usasmokingsale

    • Newbie
    • *
    • Posts: 16
    A gouache paint
    « on: 14 January 2020, 11:25:41 AM »
    A gouache paint body is composed of several elements, including pigment and an opacity agent. These density additives differ depending on the manufacturer. Some contain blanc fixe (French for permanent white); in this case its barium sulfate (also used as a filler in papers). Other makers incorporate calcium carbonate, more commonly known as chalk, or a "precipitated" (technical for synthetic) chalk. When the water container for rinsing brushes in during this painting process is emptied [You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login], one can see the thickening material as sludge on the bottom of the container. Gum arabic is the binding agent all gouache paint makers embrace to coalesce the ingredients. In some cases glycerin and preservatives are also mixed in. The principle differences between transparent watercolors and opaque is the addition of a chalky substance and the amount of gum arabic; gouache contains a higher concentration of the latter. When gouache is applied as an impasto, it's the gum arabic that can give the dried painting a pearly patina. If used too thick, as with tempera, the paint will crack. Normally, a gouache painting will have a dull surface appearance. This makes it ideal for photographic reproductive purposes and is another reason why it has been popular with illustrators.

    A few sources I've read say that gouache comes only in tubes. That is not so. I've got a Pelikan brand pan set that I acquired in my teens when I first started using this type of paint in the mid 1970's. These pans, called a "cake" form, have the advantage of being able to acquire replaceable color cakes and a built in palette. Because gouache paints can be rewet and worked when dry, as cakes become empty you can squeeze tube paints into the cake receptacles. Tubes of gouache are said to have a shelf life of 3 to 5 years, that's when the tubes solidify. When this occurs I break open the tubes and use the dried form just as I do the cake variety. Sometimes I will use a single edge razor blade to shave off needed amounts into a palette. Apparently gouache also can be purchased as a liquid, but only in small jars of black or white. These are probably the only two available because they are the two colors used in largest quantities and the heavy opacity content causes settling in the jars.




    Related Articles:

    [You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login]
    [You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login]
    [You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login]
    [You are not allowed to view links. Register or Login]